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Analysed 21,398 tweets, tweets from the last 154 weeks.
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Last 50 tweets from @HarvardBiz
What ideas is your company missing out on by failing to listen to workers on the front lines? s.hbr.org/2W5r2dn
Harnessing Everyday Genius
hbr.org
 
 
 
 
“You could imagine that if you grew up in a working-class household and saw that your mom or dad wasn’t treated well as an employee … maybe you’d be more likely to tolerate ungenerous corporate behavior.” s.hbr.org/320Dgrn
Research: CEOs from Working-Class Families Support Less-Labor-Friendly Policies
hbr.org
 
 
Social connections are a strong predictor of cognitive functioning, resilience, and engagement. We don’t just need good friends in our personal lives — we need them at work. s.hbr.org/38JRjmp
True Friends at Work
hbr.org
 
With an HBR subscription, get access to all (yes, all) of our digital content. s.hbr.org/3iZuboS
 
There are millions currently unemployed — and plenty of ways they could be reskilled. s.hbr.org/38NDpzF
What Would It Take to Reskill Entire Industries?
hbr.org
 
When bad news about a supply chain reaches customers, they're more likely to believe that the product is inferior in quality — even when the supply chain problem doesn't affect it. s.hbr.org/324W5cQ
Are You Prepared for Bad Press About One of Your Suppliers?
hbr.org
 
For many companies, virtual board meetings may be better than the real thing. s.hbr.org/32gsAFl
The Upside of Virtual Board Meetings
hbr.org
 
We have more underutilized offices, parking lots, and public spaces than ever before. Could they help solve shortages of affordable housing or senior care facilities? s.hbr.org/3fhTwYH
What Should We Do with 45,000 Half-Empty Public Buildings?
hbr.org
 
Spend less time exerting control and more time mobilizing energy and commitment. s.hbr.org/3e8IkMI
A New Prescription for Power
hbr.org
 
In 33 years of operation, only seven general managers have left the company voluntarily. s.hbr.org/2W3zfOZ
How One Fast-Food Chain Keeps Its Turnover Rates Absurdly Low
hbr.org
 
 
Research shows that people are more likely to procrastinate when they’re overwhelmed by the amount of stuff in their homes. s.hbr.org/3fkFINm
The Case for Finally Cleaning Your Desk
hbr.org
 
 
 
 
 
“For us at Slack, the time has also been indelibly marked by the experience of coming together to help one another, our customers (old and new), and so many groups on the frontlines of the crisis.” s.hbr.org/38GjuCD
The CEO of Slack on Adapting in Response to a Global Crisis
hbr.org
 
 
 
It’s not always going to be the right time to share something at work — and there may be identities or aspects of your life that you decide never to share. But there is power in vulnerability. s.hbr.org/2ObV4Yt
Parents, Bring Your Whole Self to Work
hbr.org
 
Use this tool to help you identify and overcome the daily stresses that are wearing you down. s.hbr.org/2ZcMIpF
Dont Let Micro-Stresses Burn You Out
hbr.org
 
The pandemic has drastically changed people’s lives, and they are looking to their managers more than ever for guidance and support. s.hbr.org/2Dne1Fj
5 Tips for Communicating with Employees During a Crisis
hbr.org
 
With tens of millions of people unemployed and loan delinquencies higher than they have ever been, a significant round of defaults seems inevitable. Here's what banks can do about that. s.hbr.org/3iM5tbm
How Banks Can Avoid a Repeat of the 2008 Foreclosure Crisis
hbr.org
 
Unfortunately, many people need to worry about being fired on the spot when they give notice. s.hbr.org/2CkgobD
3 Mistakes Executives Make When Telling People That Theyre Leaving
hbr.org
 
Ace your presentations with slides, graphics and more from HBR’s Visual Library. Subscribe today. s.hbr.org/2AJUVbD
 
Truly great cultures exist when behaviors, systems, and practices all line up with the organization’s values. s.hbr.org/38GXw2t
Why Great Employees Leave Great Cultures
hbr.org
 
We know that in-person social interaction is healthy. But research confirms that the more you use Facebook, the worse off you are in terms of both mental health and well-being. s.hbr.org/3elhuRP
A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel
hbr.org
 
Personal strength, improved relationships, and an appreciation for life. These are just some of the ways we can grow after times of crisis and trauma. s.hbr.org/2BT6YUx
Growth After Trauma
hbr.org
 
"If you don’t get much vacation time, can’t afford to take any time off, or work for a boss who scowls at the idea of a two-week vacation – or even a single full week off – you will have to figure out a workaround." s.hbr.org/2Oc2wCK
If You Cant Take a Vacation, Get the Most Out of Minibreaks
hbr.org
 
“You can argue that on average, the men have more [game] attendance than the women. But if you have 10 people on sales for them and one person for the women, it’s not a fair comparison.” s.hbr.org/2CjTCAu
Lifes Work: An Interview with Megan Rapinoe
hbr.org
 
Loneliness is threatening our physical health, our well-being, and our livelihood. s.hbr.org/324lfZ9
Americas Loneliest Workers, According to Research
hbr.org
 
“Most negotiators focus exclusively on maximizing the value of the deal at hand. In doing so, they often undermine the success of future negotiations — their own and those of their colleagues.” s.hbr.org/38DSNi8
Whats Your Negotiation Strategy?
hbr.org
 
One study found that 61% of employees “cover” their identities in some way, downplaying parts of themselves due to fear that they’ll be discriminated against or seen as not taking their work seriously enough. s.hbr.org/2CgLDV1
Parents, Bring Your Whole Self to Work
hbr.org
 
Don’t miss out on all that HBR has to offer. Subscribe today and enjoy our Digital and Magazine Archives, editor-curated Reading Lists, Visual Library, a selection of HBS Case Studies, and 4 ebooks per year. s.hbr.org/2O99tob
 
Stress comes to us all in tiny little assaults throughout the day — the problem is that most of us believe it has to be this way. s.hbr.org/2BJqxyF
Dont Let Micro-Stresses Burn You Out
hbr.org
 
Most leaders need to communicate to staff far more often than they think is necessary. s.hbr.org/3eh8U6i
5 Tips for Communicating with Employees During a Crisis
hbr.org
 
As we face the likelihood of serious defaults on mortgage loans following the pandemic, lenders should avoid a repeat of what happened in 2008. s.hbr.org/2W1HIT3
How Banks Can Avoid a Repeat of the 2008 Foreclosure Crisis
hbr.org
 
 
The most transformative companies of 2019 have seen larger percentages of their revenue in new-growth, given their legacy businesses new life, and posted strong financial performance. s.hbr.org/2O2mOyG
The Top 20 Business Transformations of the Last Decade
hbr.org
 
 
“Many studies show that professionals build knowledge, skills, and networks and benefit economically from geographic moves.” s.hbr.org/2DnIzXB
Make the Most of Your Relocation
hbr.org
 
Businesses need employees with soft skills. Are universities doing enough to teach them? s.hbr.org/31YjjkW
Does Higher Education Still Prepare People for Jobs?
hbr.org
 
In this increasingly competitive hiring landscape, strategically positioning yourself can lead to a coveted job offer down the road. @hbrascend #WorkHappy s.hbr.org/3gDBJeT
How to Choose the Right Virtual Internship
hbrascend.org
 
In 2019, companies spent an average of $2,420 per person to enhance employee happiness. Yet, only 13% of these employees were truly satisfied at work. How can managers raise the bar? Research suggests this three-part process. s.hbr.org/38C33aA
Why Employee Experience Initiatives Fall Short
hbr.org
 
Networking is a lot easier if you focus on what you might learn from potential connections. s.hbr.org/2O8L2XU
Learn to Love Networking
hbr.org
 
When you start a new job and it’s far from what you thought it would be, is it best to stick it out and wait for things to get better — or move on? s.hbr.org/31UgWzC
Case Study: Stick with a Bad New Job or Cut Your Losses?
hbr.org
 
 
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