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Analysed 3,877 tweets, tweets from the last 45 weeks.
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Last 50 tweets from @shreyas
. @shreyas is the Jerry Seinfeld of Product Management.

Astute observations of (PM) life which you can’t unsee once he has pointed it out.
Replying to @sushantkoshy
That’s a seriously kind analogy (speaking as a huge Jerry Seinfeld fan) 🙏🏾🙂
 
In reply to @shreyas
And yet a couple GREAT designers could change that equation...
Replying to @andrewmd
Indeed, they could and they often do. So thankful for great designers (and great design leader counterparts).
 
 
Should I NFT this thread? 🤔
This thread is a work of art.
 
In reply to @giffco
I mean, you can extrapolate that to a lot of searches for silver bullets. ”New exec!” is just one of many amazing miracle pill solutions companies love to go for.
Replying to @forssto @giffco
And when looking for & onboarding a new exec, best for founders / CEOs to be aware of the IL's playbook
First-time founders, CEOs, and even employees should understand the playbook of the Incompetent Leader (IL).

The IL is savvy & charismatic, and excels at 4 things:
1) Feign competence
2) Create confusion
3) Buy time
4) Fail up

The IL playbook & what to do about it
👇🏾
 
In reply to @shreyas
- Hi! Love your threads. I'm running an introduction to Product Management course and love the clarity of this model - would it be ok if I used it with links to you and this thread? Many thanks for all you do for us PdMs!
Replying to @dubjim
Sure, feel free to use it with attribution and a link to the source.
 
In reply to @shreyas
What a terrific thread, Shreyas!! Wow, as always relatable to my situation and dealing with inflight situations! It especially rung true to me when I read “you still don’t actually have enough engineers (!)” This in my opinion is where a PM’s job really meets the road 🤪😅😂
Replying to @kjalaman
Apparently, one can never have enough money or enough engineers.
 
In reply to @shreyas
First law of @RichMironov's software economics: mironov.com/4laws1/
Replying to @dubjim @RichMironov
Rich speaks wisdom.
 
Shreyas Doshi Retweeted ·  
What a thread. I picture @shreyas sitting in the woods with a flashlight up to his face, suspensfully stepping from one tweet to the next in this all too familiar Product Management horror story that starts with the simple phrase “We need more engineers…” 👻
 
In reply to @shreyas
At the end of all this, someone pulls the short end of the stick, and it's not the pm?
Replying to @tehlike
Even PMs experience luck every once in a while :) Also, in this saga the PM actually got long-term unlucky (despite the promotion), s/he just doesn't realize it yet.
 
In reply to @shreyas
I thought there was going to be a twist during the promo piece. Couldn’t be promoted because key gaps were identified. And then the narrative turns to adding those gaps as part of OKRs
Replying to @HershNagar
That’s for the sequel.
 
In reply to @shreyas
This is all too real… I have to write up the part leading to the Engineering Manager silently nodding when they probably knew they won’t be able to ship {Feature X} the next quarter with more HQ but they can’t get to Sr EM without doubling the team!
Replying to @GergelyOrosz
Ha, yes, I would love to read that part.
 
In reply to @shreyas
This is both funny and not funny
Replying to @TommayC
That should be my bio 😄
 
In reply to @shreyas
@shreyas is now part-comedian. But the thread is so true!
Replying to @LakshmanThatai
Ha, true story: Once a long time ago, a colleague at Google said to me: "You should be a stand up comedian" I beamed with excitement and happiness about someone recognizing my latent talent. Then she added: "... I mean a stand up comedian in *tech circles* " Now I am a PM.
 
In reply to @shreyas
I hear curb your enthusiasm end credit music at this tweet. Just me?
Replying to @PerfectoPotenza
My favorite show of all time.
 
In reply to @shreyas
You outdid yourself on this one 👏
Replying to @thijsniks
Thanks 😀 What was your favorite part of this?
 
In reply to @shreyas
And then, 35 minutes into this Product Review, the CEO says: “The plan looks really good. Thank you. I have just one question. What will make you go even faster in 2022?”
Replying to @shreyas
You briefly glance at your Engineering counterpart, smile, and you hear yourself confidently saying to the CEO: “We need [N] more engineers” You my friend, are now, back at the top of this thread:
Since time immemorial, when a CEO asks a PM at Product Review, “what do you need to 10X users/revenue?”, “what will make you go faster?”, etc the PM steadfastly responds “We need [N] more engineers”. The Eng Mgr nods approvingly.

A story thread, with some hard truths to swallow:
 
In reply to @shreyas
You diligently ramp up, and after a few more weeks, are nervous (but well prepared) for a Product Review for your new product’s 2022 roadmap with the CEO. You monte-carlo the scenarios, the questions, the pushback. Get pre-aligned with your Eng/Design/…. counterparts, etc.
Replying to @shreyas
And then, 35 minutes into this Product Review, the CEO says: “The plan looks really good. Thank you. I have just one question. What will make you go even faster in 2022?”
 
In reply to @shreyas
So you discuss this with your manager and the decision gets made: you will work on a different product with larger scope because the Sr. PM for that product just left the company. You say goodbye to your old product team. They say they will miss you. You will miss them too.
Replying to @shreyas
You diligently ramp up, and after a few more weeks, are nervous (but well prepared) for a Product Review for your new product’s 2022 roadmap with the CEO. You monte-carlo the scenarios, the questions, the pushback. Get pre-aligned with your Eng/Design/…. counterparts, etc.
 
In reply to @shreyas
You are happy about the promo, but now you have another problem. viii) your current product scope is too small for a Sr. PM
Replying to @shreyas
So you discuss this with your manager and the decision gets made: you will work on a different product with larger scope because the Sr. PM for that product just left the company. You say goodbye to your old product team. They say they will miss you. You will miss them too.
 
In reply to @shreyas
Fast forward to the promo cycle in early Q4, the promotion committee has a rigorous discussion especially about the metrics your team moved in Q3. It’s a metrics-driven culture after all! Not everyone agrees, but your promo packet looked very good overall, so you’re now a Sr. PM.
Replying to @shreyas
You are happy about the promo, but now you have another problem. viii) your current product scope is too small for a Sr. PM
 
In reply to @shreyas
But you say: “Great idea! That experiment uncovered some quality issues, but lets launch it now & we will identify & fix those issues in Q4. In fact, I’ll make a note to myself to make sure that we add a few followup quality improvement experiments to our Q4 OKRs” Decision made!
Replying to @shreyas
Fast forward to the promo cycle in early Q4, the promotion committee has a rigorous discussion especially about the metrics your team moved in Q3. It’s a metrics-driven culture after all! Not everyone agrees, but your promo packet looked very good overall, so you’re now a Sr. PM.
 
In reply to @shreyas
You think to yourself: <“Hmm… we did see a nice bump in sign ups, but I talked to a few of those users and they said that they didn’t actually intend to create an account. That experiment also isn’t aligned with the sign up flow changes we’ve envisioned for next year.”>
Replying to @shreyas
But you say: “Great idea! That experiment uncovered some quality issues, but lets launch it now & we will identify & fix those issues in Q4. In fact, I’ll make a note to myself to make sure that we add a few followup quality improvement experiments to our Q4 OKRs” Decision made!
 
In reply to @shreyas
Your Design & Data Science counterparts propose an idea: “Remember that experiment in Q1 that increased sign ups by 18%, but we didn’t launch it because of higher churn in that cohort? We can revive it.” Eng Mgr: “Ah, it can be turned back on with a flag. Can launch next week”
Replying to @shreyas
You think to yourself: <“Hmm… we did see a nice bump in sign ups, but I talked to a few of those users and they said that they didn’t actually intend to create an account. That experiment also isn’t aligned with the sign up flow changes we’ve envisioned for next year.”>
 
In reply to @shreyas
You say: “We clearly can’t launch some of the feature improvements we had envisioned in Q3. But remember, our OKRs were framed in terms of metrics to move, not in terms of launches (yay us!) So let’s brainstorm on ways to still hit these metrics before EOQ, some quick wins.”
Replying to @shreyas
Your Design & Data Science counterparts propose an idea: “Remember that experiment in Q1 that increased sign ups by 18%, but we didn’t launch it because of higher churn in that cohort? We can revive it.” Eng Mgr: “Ah, it can be turned back on with a flag. Can launch next week”
 
In reply to @shreyas
Yikes, you now have a seventh problem vii) an optics problem You wanted to do the right thing for the company, but you decide it isn’t worth the personal risk. You need to strike a balance. So you organize an OKR review with your Eng, Design, Data Science, etc. counterparts.
Replying to @shreyas
You say: “We clearly can’t launch some of the feature improvements we had envisioned in Q3. But remember, our OKRs were framed in terms of metrics to move, not in terms of launches (yay us!) So let’s brainstorm on ways to still hit these metrics before EOQ, some quick wins.”
 
In reply to @shreyas
This begets another problem. Your team will now definitely miss its high-pri Q3 OKRs. You dutifully give a heads-up to your manager (usually a Director/ VP Product) in your next 1:1. Your manager says “I get it. It’s the right call. But you’re coming up for a promo next cycle.”
Replying to @shreyas
Yikes, you now have a seventh problem vii) an optics problem You wanted to do the right thing for the company, but you decide it isn’t worth the personal risk. You need to strike a balance. So you organize an OKR review with your Eng, Design, Data Science, etc. counterparts.
 
In reply to @shreyas
vi) an eng onboarding problem The Eng Mgr mentions in your 1:1 that Alice & Bob (2 of the team’s most senior engineers) will be spending 50% of their time for the next 8 weeks on internal docs & training material to make eng onboarding smoother. Right call, but it still stings.
Replying to @shreyas
This begets another problem. Your team will now definitely miss its high-pri Q3 OKRs. You dutifully give a heads-up to your manager (usually a Director/ VP Product) in your next 1:1. Your manager says “I get it. It’s the right call. But you’re coming up for a promo next cycle.”
 
In reply to @shreyas
It isn’t all terrible though. The Eng Mgr’s & team’s overall recruiting efforts are starting to bear fruit. You have 2 engineers joining in a few weeks, and 2 more offers signed. Everyone wants to make sure these engineers have a great onboarding experience. Enter another problem
Replying to @shreyas
vi) an eng onboarding problem The Eng Mgr mentions in your 1:1 that Alice & Bob (2 of the team’s most senior engineers) will be spending 50% of their time for the next 8 weeks on internal docs & training material to make eng onboarding smoother. Right call, but it still stings.
 
In reply to @shreyas
So now you have at least one, maybe two more problems: iv) a potential morale problem among the engineers who were reallocated from the reliability project to the P0 OKRs v) an increased product reliability risk (now, or at least in the near future)
Replying to @shreyas
It isn’t all terrible though. The Eng Mgr’s & team’s overall recruiting efforts are starting to bear fruit. You have 2 engineers joining in a few weeks, and 2 more offers signed. Everyone wants to make sure these engineers have a great onboarding experience. Enter another problem
 
In reply to @shreyas
In the midst of all the exec reviews & hiring activity, your team couldn’t even begin 2 of your high-pri (P0) OKRs (with just 6 weeks left in Q3!) You huddle with your Eng Mgr counterpart and (reluctantly) decide to put that P1 reliability project on pause, to staff those P0 OKRs
Replying to @shreyas
So now you have at least one, maybe two more problems: iv) a potential morale problem among the engineers who were reallocated from the reliability project to the P0 OKRs v) an increased product reliability risk (now, or at least in the near future)
 
In reply to @shreyas
Whereas before you had a “I don’t have enough engineers” problem, now you have 3 problems: i) a hiring problem ii) a near-term output & outcomes problem (you have OKRs to hit for goodness’ sakes) iii) you still don’t actually have enough engineers (!)
Replying to @shreyas
In the midst of all the exec reviews & hiring activity, your team couldn’t even begin 2 of your high-pri (P0) OKRs (with just 6 weeks left in Q3!) You huddle with your Eng Mgr counterpart and (reluctantly) decide to put that P1 reliability project on pause, to staff those P0 OKRs
 
In reply to @shreyas
So your “I don’t have enough engineers” problem is now a hiring problem. Thank goodness you’re not the one chiefly responsible for hiring 10 more engineers. But your Eng Mgr counterpart is. This means s/he will be (rightly) focused on that. The team’s output will usually suffer.
Replying to @shreyas
Whereas before you had a “I don’t have enough engineers” problem, now you have 3 problems: i) a hiring problem ii) a near-term output & outcomes problem (you have OKRs to hit for goodness’ sakes) iii) you still don’t actually have enough engineers (!)
 
In reply to @shreyas
When you finally manage to get more eng headcount, things will usually get worse before they get better. Management will now expect your team’s *immediate* output to be in proportion with this *new* headcount, not with your *current* staffing. Not fair, but that’s how it goes.
Replying to @shreyas
So your “I don’t have enough engineers” problem is now a hiring problem. Thank goodness you’re not the one chiefly responsible for hiring 10 more engineers. But your Eng Mgr counterpart is. This means s/he will be (rightly) focused on that. The team’s output will usually suffer.
 
In reply to @shreyas
“More engineers” will usually *not* solve your problems. Because the real problem is often a strategy problem, culture problem, interpersonal problem, trust problem, creativity problem, or market problem. More engineers *will* solve your “I don’t have enough engineers” problem.
Replying to @shreyas
When you finally manage to get more eng headcount, things will usually get worse before they get better. Management will now expect your team’s *immediate* output to be in proportion with this *new* headcount, not with your *current* staffing. Not fair, but that’s how it goes.
 
Since time immemorial, when a CEO asks a PM at Product Review, “what do you need to 10X users/revenue?”, “what will make you go faster?”, etc the PM steadfastly responds “We need [N] more engineers”. The Eng Mgr nods approvingly.

A story thread, with some hard truths to swallow:
Replying to @shreyas
“More engineers” will usually *not* solve your problems. Because the real problem is often a strategy problem, culture problem, interpersonal problem, trust problem, creativity problem, or market problem. More engineers *will* solve your “I don’t have enough engineers” problem.
 
Since time immemorial, when a CEO asks a PM at Product Review, “what do you need to 10X users/revenue?”, “what will make you go faster?”, etc the PM steadfastly responds “We need [N] more engineers”. The Eng Mgr nods approvingly.

A story thread, with some hard truths to swallow:
 
In reply to @okaysee
This story from @chrisbosh at his HOF speech about Kobe after losing in the NBA Finals getting ready for Team USA practice clearly left a mark on Bosh about what focus and killer instinct looks likes. twitter.com/Lakers/status/…
Replying to @okaysee @chrisbosh
Loved listening to that story, thanks for sharing!
 
In reply to @shreyas
Do you have a similar thread for a Tech Lead?
Replying to @sahildua2305
I don’t know enough about the TL role to write something like this (I have worked with plenty, but was only a quasi-TL very briefly before becoming a PM). I’d suggest content from folks like @Lethain @JorgeO @GergelyOrosz for TLs.
 
In reply to @shreyas
Yeah fair enough. Could just say he/she/they from the start though 🤔
Replying to @shereelim
Yep, that is how I had initially drafted that thread, but among other things, the use of he/she/they made the content extremely confusing for *this particular thread* e.g. is "they" referring to the manager or to the people reporting to the manager? So had to choose clarity here.
 
In reply to @shreyas
Persistent use of the pronoun “him/his/he”
Replying to @shereelim
I'd suggest re-reading the thread.
 
In reply to @shreyas
Do any of these stages include managers who are female?
Replying to @shereelim
Why do you ask? (and I'd perhaps suggest re-reading the thread)
 
What advice would you give to someone who is managing people for the first time?
Replying to @briannekimmel
1) You don’t have to have all the answers 2) Understand these stages of manager maturity
4 stages of maturity as a manager

(trigger warning: might feel too real)

👇🏾
 
In reply to @DeviShetty4
3. For non-US residents (eg: I dwell in Australia), paid subscription is expensive considering FX rates. Pricing might prove well to US readers and viable as local maximum (hill climbing algorithm) but since you have followers worldwide, unsure on the pricing and the translation
Replying to @DeviShetty4
Thanks for sharing, this is incredibly helpful. One criterion I have in my research of newsletter platforms is the ability to have country-specific pricing (I.e. not just charging based on whatever the FX rate is).
 
In reply to @nathanbarry
Agreed! I started with Substack and moved to Convertkit because of a bunch of limitations. Substack is great if you do _everything_ their way. Many consider it “training school” and then you graduate to something like ConvertKit—but why not just use ConvertKit from the start?
Is ConvertKit more effort to manage / maintain than something like Substack?
 
In reply to @shreyas
You can setup a Zap to add new sign-ups to your Substack from Revue. The reading and writing experience on Revue is sub-par. Also, if u care about SEO in the long term then u should have a Ghost blog. Substack has poor SEO.
Replying to @ayushtweetshere
How would that work with paid subscriptions?
 
In reply to @shreyas
we've just started building it! 🔥🔥
Replying to @hnag
Exciting! I am very curious what Google-only differentiators you're thinking of e.g. better Gmail integration (maybe even a Google Reader type interface? :) ), better email delivery, leveraging Google accounts / payments, integration with Google docs for writing, etc.
 
Replying to @hnag
Will Google keep it alive? :)
 
In reply to @shreyas
I'd guess that 5 years from now Substack will still be focused on email newsletters.. lord knows what Twitter will be doing with Revue or FB with Bulletin
Replying to @firasd
Solid point.
 
In reply to @shreyas
As long as readers would get atleast one newsletter /month as a free subscription 🙂
Replying to @DeviShetty4
Can you say more about what's appealing regd. a free post every month?
 
 
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