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Analysed 42,000 tweets, tweets from the last 197 weeks.
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Last 50 tweets from @TheAtlantic
Today's book recommendation: "The Man Who Ran Washington," by Peter Baker and Susan Glasser, frames (unrelated) James Baker’s story around his late-in-life struggle over whether to vote for Trump, a man he plainly can’t stand personally or politically. on.theatln.tc/h6duWIJ
Whats the One Book That Explains American Politics Today?
theatlantic.com
 
"J. Edgar Hoover could be more complicated—and more surprising—than his fearsome reputation might suggest." @BeverlyGage on the lessons of the FBI director's fight against the Klan: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
How Hoover Took Down the Klan
theatlantic.com
 
Scientists are turning to chili peppers to keep dolphins out of fishing nets—but the marine mammals seem to enjoy spicy fish just fine, @sarahkeartes reports for @hakaimagazine: on.theatln.tc/N587VuD
Dolphins Might Have Elite Spice Tolerance
theatlantic.com
 
"This is not just an internecine battle for greater equality and opportunity within an elite profession. It is a battle to improve economics itself ... and thus to improve public policy, and thus to improve everyone’s lives," @AnnieLowrey writes:
on.theatln.tc/bh233Y7
Harassment in Economics Doesnt Stay in Economics
theatlantic.com
 
"High rents and sale prices in major cities are a policy choice, one that puts gates around many of our most wonderful places and taxes the folks lucky enough to live there," @AnnieLowrey writes: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
The U.S. Needs More Housing Than Almost Anyone Can Imagine
theatlantic.com
 
"Even though millions of people suffer from them every year, researchers still don’t know much about what fundamentally causes these sores," @mimbsy writes:
on.theatln.tc/vYbB2iW
 
The U.S. may have tied with England in Friday's World Cup match, "but the U.S. was the better team," writes @FranklinFoer.
on.theatln.tc/em2bGKY
At Last, the Americans Have Arrived
theatlantic.com
 
A personal pizza may seem sad, but it doesn't have to be. @bymariandrew on the joys of solitude food. theatlantic.com/culture/archiv…
What You Learn From Eating Alone
theatlantic.com
 
The weapons deployed in Ukraine by both sides are still far from the full nightmare potential, explains @MarkBowdenwrite. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…
 
Juliet Tuttle was a well-known advocate for animals. She also may have been the most prolific pet killer in American history, poisoning dogs and hunting cats through the streets of New York City. @PaganKennedy reports on how Tuttle got away with it. on.theatln.tc/oO3teDk
New Yorks Grand Dame of Dog Poisoning
theatlantic.com
 
"She Said" is not a self-congratulatory film about the rise of the #MeToo movement. It’s a journalism movie that understands that empathy can require immense effort—and that even then, such effort might not lead to certain success, @shirklesxp writes: on.theatln.tc/fCfvppv
A #MeToo Movie Devoid of Sensationalism
theatlantic.com
 
"Soccer used to be laddish, even boorish, and marred by booze-soaked hooliganism. Now it is woke." @tommctague on the spectacle of politics and protest at the Qatar World Cup. on.theatln.tc/AoPaAd7
Empires of Soccer
theatlantic.com
 
"The war in Ukraine proves that the U.S. can provide more effective strategic aid than any other country in the world—without necessarily having to rely on sending its own troops," @PhillipsPOBrien writes.
on.theatln.tc/IZsQRNx
The Future of American Warfare Is Unfolding in Ukraine
theatlantic.com
 
On almost every measure of educational success from pre-K to postgrad, boys and young men now lag well behind their female classmates. But there’s a simple way to help boys do better, @RichardvReeves argues: Start them a year later than girls. theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…
Redshirt the Boys
theatlantic.com
 
The older we get, the more we need our friends—and the harder it is to keep them, @JenSeniorNY writes. What does it take to keep a friendship thriving in middle age? theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…
Its Your Friends Who Break Your Heart
theatlantic.com
 
In COVID, the science writer David Quammen confronted a story that refused to stay at a safe distance—one that has almost all the wonder and joy leached out of it, @josh_sokol wrote after a visit with Quammen at his Montana home. theatlantic.com/books/archive/…
The Science Writer Every Science Nerd Wants You to Read
theatlantic.com
 
"Without structural changes to that system or shifts in the nature of the Republican coalition, Trump may go, but the conservative demand for Trumpism will remain," @AdamSerwer writes: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
Rebelling Against Trump Is Not the Same as Rebelling Against Trumpism
theatlantic.com
 
"I had a good relationship with gratitude before, but since I came to the U.S., it is even stronger," @bushra_seddique, who fled the Taliban in 2021, tells @IsabelFattal. "I have a lot more to be thankful for than last year." theatlantic.com/newsletters/ar…
 
What makes Art Spiegelman’s “Maus” controversial—its frank visual depiction of horrors, its work as a testimony that reveals how othering occurs—is exactly what makes it valuable, Hillary Chute writes. theatlantic.com/books/archive/…
Why Maus Matters Now
theatlantic.com
 
“Defamation litigation can’t cleanse the public square of falsehoods,” @DavidAFrench writes. But it is “one small part of a larger bipartisan legal effort that helped save the United States from a grave constitutional crisis.” on.theatln.tc/aeGxyF3
How Defamation Litigation Is Fighting Election Denial and Saving Democracy
newsletters.theatlantic.com
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
Day six and it’s the United States versus England, big Satan versus little Satan in the great battle of the evil imperialists. Only now, it is the island that is now the imaginative colony...
theatlantic.com/newsletters/ar…
Empires of Soccer
theatlantic.com
 
"Soccer used to be laddish, even boorish, and marred by booze-soaked hooliganism. Now it is woke." @tommctague on the spectacle of politics and protest at the Qatar World Cup. on.theatln.tc/dUPNyAR
Empires of Soccer
theatlantic.com
 
"The most basic fact about the housing crisis is the supply shortage. Yet many people deny this reality," @JerusalemDemsas writes: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
Housing Breaks Peoples Brains
theatlantic.com
 
"She Said" is not a self-congratulatory film about the rise of the #MeToo movement. It’s a journalism movie that understands that empathy can require immense effort—and that even then, such effort might not lead to certain success, @shirklesxp writes: on.theatln.tc/Nl4R4yU
A #MeToo Movie Devoid of Sensationalism
theatlantic.com
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
Latest piece in @TheAtlantic appeared. Looking at Ukraine and Afghanistan, the US should learn the lesson that if it has to do the fighting, its usually bad. If the US is prudent, it must only use its force to help those who want to fight for themselves. theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
The Future of American Warfare Is Unfolding in Ukraine
theatlantic.com
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
Photos of the Week: World Cup, Plymouth Pilgrim, German Sunlight - 35 images from the past seven days, including blackouts in Ukrainian cities, swimming with sharks in Israel, a Thanksgiving turkey at the White House, and much more theatln.tc/ZgpsOf1L
 
Juliet Tuttle was a well-known advocate for animals. She also may have been the most prolific pet killer in American history, poisoning dogs and hunting cats through the streets of New York City. @PaganKennedy reports on how Tuttle got away with it. on.theatln.tc/ZWUiNrE
New Yorks Grand Dame of Dog Poisoning
theatlantic.com
 
In American lore, friendly Indians helped freedom-loving colonists. In real life, the Wampanoags had a problem they didn’t know how to fix, David J. Silverman wrote in 2019. ⁠The so-called first Thanksgiving was the fruit of a political decision. on.theatln.tc/YRRMu0k
 
"About your eyes, not a savior’s eyes / but brown as blood. I was wrong / about the God I warped / into a weapon, a garrison. / Wrong about love, too." Read a new poem by @EugeniaLeigh: theatlantic.com/books/archive/…
 
"When you actually are dealing with people in the merchandising and all that, there is a lot of thought put into it—what’s being marked down and how much it’s being discounted," Maxine Builder, editor of The Strategist, tells @mimbsy: on.theatln.tc/BjRMzrm
When Black Friday Is Your Super Bowl
theatlantic.com
 
A sunset in the Caribbean, blackouts in Ukrainian cities, a Thanksgiving turkey at the White House, a memorial for the victims of a shooting in Colorado Springs, and more: on.theatln.tc/1Mg04Gf
 
"The war in Ukraine proves that the U.S. can provide more effective strategic aid than any other country in the world—without necessarily having to rely on sending its own troops," @PhillipsPOBrien writes.
on.theatln.tc/TzVmWHp
The Future of American Warfare Is Unfolding in Ukraine
theatlantic.com
 
Before his abuses of power were exposed, J. Edgar Hoover was celebrated as a scourge of Nazis, Communists, and subversives, @jacklgoldsmith writes. theatlantic.com/magazine/archi…
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
I got into a little debate with @Saahil_Desai and @danengber over the trajectory of Thanksgiving food—and of American food culture in general—over the past 50 years. theatlantic.com/technology/arc…
Is Food Getting Better?
theatlantic.com
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
 
The Atlantic Retweeted ·  
"People of higher socioeconomic status ... are more prone to entitlement and narcissistic behavior. Wealthier subjects also tend to be more self-oriented and more willing to behave unethically in their own self-interest." theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
Research Proves It: Theres No Such Thing as Noblesse Oblige
theatlantic.com
 
Living in Senegal taught @ClintSmithIII how soccer can connect people across nationalities, cultures, and lines of difference. In Radio Atlantic, Smith explains how “the beautiful game” has sometimes turned ugly—but can still inspire many: on.theatln.tc/ELuPd8o
Radio Atlantic: For Love of the Game
theatlantic.com
 
 
"Why are some American neighborhoods so vulnerable to so much violence?" writes Patrick Sharkey. "To answer this question requires thinking less in terms of months and years, and more in terms of decades." theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
The Crime Spike Is No Mystery
theatlantic.com
 
We spend so much time watching over kids and shuttling them to activities. But what about carving out time for them to be on their own? @fhill_official on the surprising benefits of solitude in childhood: theatlantic.com/family/archive…
How Much Alone Time Do Kids Need?
theatlantic.com
 
The GOP’s plans for aggressive investigations may present as much political risk for the investigators as it does for the targets, @RonBrownstein writes: on.theatln.tc/xK75l9Z
The House GOPs Investigation Conundrum
theatlantic.com
 
“Twitter’s financial performance is not the biggest thing the banks have to worry about,” writes @JamesSurowiecki. “The biggest risk is that Musk gets bored with his new toy and decides that managing a town square is too much of a hassle”: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
What Were Elon Musks Lenders Thinking?
theatlantic.com
 
Growing up in a fundamentalist family with a beloved adopted brother shaped @MckeanCarrie's views on abortion. But in the aftermath of Roe v. Wade being overturned, the writer reconsiders the hero story her family always told themselves: theatlantic.com/family/archive…
My Family Oversimplified My Brothers Adoption Story
theatlantic.com
 
It didn’t take long for the 2022 World Cups’s first refereeing controversy to arrive. @jdkstern13 on how VAR is distorting soccer: theatlantic.com/technology/arc…
 
"The World Cup should have never been held in Qatar," writes @ClintSmithIII, "but if one is to look for an upside, the timing of the tournament does provide a unique opportunity to share moments that otherwise wouldn’t have happened." theatlantic.com/newsletters/ar…
 
"If free speech and fighting racism come into conflict, which is more important? If you think you know how American conservatives and progressives would answer that question, I’ve got a story to confound you," @conor64 writes: theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
Ron DeSantiss Speech Policing Could Hurt the Right Too
theatlantic.com
 
The Thanksgivings of yore featured overcooked turkeys and Jell-O salad. Now we have Peking-duck Thanksgiving and more produce options than ever before. Surely that’s an improvement—right? @Saahil_Desai, @danengber, and @amandamull discuss: on.theatln.tc/DOBXdzc
 
Paxlovid, the amazing antiviral drug, has been widely available since the spring—yet the number of COVID deaths per day in the U.S. hasn’t budged. One problem, writes @rachgutman, is that people aren’t taking it. Who are these anti-Paxxers? theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Inside the Mind of an Anti-Paxxer
theatlantic.com
 
Thanksgiving is the average American's favorite holiday. For "How to Build a Life," @arthurbrooks investigates whether that's because overindulgence makes us happier than regular indulgence: on.theatln.tc/douJDR0
Does Overindulgence Make You Happy?
theatlantic.com
 
"The Saudi silence stems from lessons the kingdom absorbed during the events that turned the Persian monarchy into an Islamic Republic: Wait until the outcome is clear, and then wait some more," @KimGhattas writes: on.theatln.tc/lhEyNc1
Why Saudi Arabia Is So Quiet About Irans Protests
theatlantic.com
 
 
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