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Last 50 tweets from @TheEconomist
Many in America saw the 2020 elections as unfair. “Even though…half the people would be happy with the results and half the people would be sad, you could trust the results,” argues Brad Raffensperger, @GaSecofState on “Checks and Balance” econ.st/3Nb5zaS
 
“Professional exonerators” were responsible for 60% of overturned convictions last year econ.st/39SO9RT
Exonerations in America have risen, and their pattern is revealing
economist.com
 
In 2012 the Large Hadron Collider at @CERN spotted the Higgs boson, the final piece of the jigsaw known as the Standard Model of particle physics. As the collider restarts after a three-year break, we ask what it might reveal next on “Babbage” econ.st/3Nlkhw5
 
Residents of Beijing pay very little for water. The country’s most prominent environmentalist hopes that when they turn on the taps, they realise the real cost is much higher econ.st/3PnE2EX
Chinas Grand Canal is full for the first time in decades
economist.com
 
For more than two years, North Korea has shut itself off from the world. Yet instead of using that time to immunise its population or prepare for an eventual outbreak, the regime just sat on its hands econ.st/3FWdHcP
 
If Gustavo Petro were to be killed it would be a moral indictment of Colombian democracy that would risk a downward spiral into violence econ.st/3woBQEx
 
As Vladimir Putin’s regime shifts from a relatively open authoritarianism towards a more closed dictatorship, its propaganda is changing, too econ.st/3MpKp8O
 
While Russia is struggling to replenish its forces, Western arms—including heavy artillery—are now flowing into Ukraine econ.st/38pmckB
 
Ukraine’s defence ministry says 264 of its fighters in Mariupol surrendered to Russian units on May 16th econ.st/3NiFl6m
Mariupols last Ukrainian defenders begin to surrender
economist.com
 
Some people’s idea of heaven is listening to strangers crinkle packaging or watching them mix paint. This phenomenon is known as ASMR—autonomous sensory meridian response econ.st/3FVN87u
 
“If judges act like politicians, and then have no accountability for that, then we're left in a situation that's ultimately less democratic.”

Legal historian @maryrziegler assesses the independence of the Supreme Court, on “The Economist Asks” econ.st/3yAi8sk
 
Accomplished writers and literature buffs are part of a new generation of video-game creators econ.st/3LcCri4
 
An analysis of Twitter posts suggests that Russia’s online information operations may already be bearing fruit econ.st/3PlTX6E
Russia is swaying Twitter users outside the West to its side
economist.com
 
As Pennsylvania’s primary elections kick off, listen to our “Checks and Balance” podcast, in which we ask: what makes this race so fascinating? econ.st/3wjuZxu
 
Black holes themselves cannot be seen: their gravitational fields are so strong that nothing can escape them—including light. But it is possible to see the gas which surrounds the hole
econ.st/3Pqx4iE
 
Some were traumatised, others disillusioned. A few were liberated to become new versions of themselves. How the pandemic changed our lives
econ.st/3wfYYq6
Generation covid: how the virus changed our lives, from 0-100
economist.com
 
“Trust”, a new novel, highlights the way history’s dominant storytellers—mostly white and male—have tended to sideline the narratives of others, such as women econ.st/3a5a0G3
Trust explores the power of money, and of storytelling
economist.com
 
“The conflict is going to rage on and in unpredictable ways.” Legal historian @maryrziegler weighs up what the aftermath of the Roe v Wade ruling could be, on “The Economist Asks” econ.st/3L5OvS5
 
Will the Large Hadron Collider unlock the secrets of the universe? @alokjha travels to @CERN at the Franco-Swiss border to find out what scientists are hoping to discover, on “Babbage”, our podcast on science and technology econ.st/3wnaq38
How to unlock the secrets of the universe
economist.com
 
Oligarchs are wielding European data-protections laws to silence critics. We explore the weird and scary world of GDPR
econ.st/3FhlhOM
Why oligarchs love European data-protection laws
economist.com
 
“Ukraine is not a battlefield; it's a crime scene,” argues Estonia’s prime minister. In a guest essay, she urges the world to “act now” econ.st/38vTMoU
Kaja Kallas on the atrocities in Ukraine
economist.com
 
“In the event that...Vladimir Putin loses office, the governance system will be in danger of collapse,” writes political scientist @SabFis3. “Regional secessionism, violence and even civil war cannot be ruled out”
econ.st/37QsdWW
 
Propaganda has long propped up Vladimir Putin's regime. Now it fuels his war machine. Explore our interactive report to find out how econ.st/3wnHnwy
 
America and the EU both wish to share more information and harmonise regulations. That may lead to a common list of sensitive technologies to be kept out of the hands of autocratic regimes econ.st/3Ll4GLu
The war in Ukraine is spurring transatlantic co-operation in tech
economist.com
 
At its core, it asserts that white people are threatened. It’s nonsense, but in America, the people who believe theories like this all too often have access to guns econ.st/3FSTqF6
 
Finland and Sweden are right to have concluded from the tragic war being waged in Ukraine that they need more security. As with NATO’s expansion in the past, their membership will help secure European peace econ.st/3ldBL1i
 
“I didn’t leave Hong Kong,” laments Kacey Wong, an artist now in Taiwan. “Hong Kong left me.” The threat of censorship—and worse—has forced many artists to leave econ.st/3wm5Fqv
Artists in exile continue to fight for Hong Kongs freedom
economist.com
 
Our correspondent walked 268 miles (431km) up the spine of Britain. He was surprised by the sheer extent of England’s wilderness econ.st/3LoF9Rw
Seventeen days walking the Pennine Way
economist.com
 
Pennsylvania is a large swing state that will be crucial to the presidential contest in 2024. As its voters head to the polls, we explain what this race reveals about the future direction of American politics econ.st/3wuVX45
 
If Germany can figure out a way to wean itself off Russian gas, @georgZachmann of @bruegel_org says “we might get into a world where not every member state stands for itself.”

Hear his interview with @birdyword on “Money Talks” econ.st/3yz6A8G
 
Elisabeth Borne’s nomination brings some political balance to the top of France’s government. But if she hails from the left it is as a technocrat, not a politician econ.st/3Nm771K
Meet Elisabeth Borne, Frances new prime minister
economist.com
 
Do you quiver with pleasure when you hear hair being brushed, or when watching someone perform a mundane task such as folding shirts? If the answer is “yes”, you’ve experienced ASMR econ.st/3wk6mR8
 
Have you experienced ASMR? Some of its fans crave relaxation. For others the appeal of such videos is frankly erotic econ.st/3Ps0tsz
 
“The Fed is in a race against time to bring down inflation before its credibility is seriously damaged,” warns the Berkeley economics professor. In a guest essay, he offers a solution econ.st/3yBJhed
 
Sequencing the genomes of newborns could offer a lifetime of returns. But such a powerful new technology creates new dangers econ.st/3PgdUvM
Whole-genome sequencing of newborn babies presents ethical quandaries
economist.com
 
Having won the 2019 election on the promise of getting Brexit “done”, another huge row would remind people that it really isn’t econ.st/3Mdw13A
The Northern Ireland protocol could soon spark a new row between Britain and Europe
economist.com
 
After more than two decades in power, Vladimir Putin is the puppet master. The Kremlin gives editors and producers “metodichki”, or guidance on what to cover and how econ.st/3MqoazF
 
As Pennsylvania’s primary elections kick off, listen to our “Checks and Balance” podcast, in which we ask: what makes this race so fascinating? econ.st/3wAoftU
 
The 12th global recession since 1900 does not seem to have started just yet. But worries are certainly mounting econ.st/3lb8xQy
Global growth is slowing, but not stoppingyet
economist.com
 
The shooting of 13 people, 11 of them black, at a supermarket in Buffalo, points to the continuing proliferation of racist conspiracy theories in America econ.st/3wlmuSu
What is the Great Replacement right-wing conspiracy theory?
economist.com
 
⚡️You wouldn’t know a global recession looms when looking at the rich world’s housing markets, many of which continue to break records.

But changes are brewing and the housing juggernaut could slow, or come crashing to a halt

twitter.com/i/events/15265…
 
Last month Sri Lanka admitted it could no longer service its foreign debts. The country is broke econ.st/3yxOynd
The president should resign to save Sri Lanka from collapse
economist.com
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
However, one floor for house prices is that, in most countries, demand still vastly outstrips supply. So-called Generation Rent is emerging as a big driver of the housing boom in the rich world econ.st/3ljnUa0 pic.twitter.com/hKtqtF0O7K
Replying to @TheEconomist
The pain of rising mortgage repayments will be harder to bear in some places than in others. Read who is most exposed here 👇 economist.com/finance-and-ec…
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
♦️ Housing markets in Britain and France could fare better in the short term but look exposed if rates rise further ♦️ Prices may be most sensitive to rate rises in Australia and New Zealand, Canada and the Nordics
Replying to @TheEconomist
However, one floor for house prices is that, in most countries, demand still vastly outstrips supply. So-called Generation Rent is emerging as a big driver of the housing boom in the rich world econ.st/3ljnUa0
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
Some housing markets seem set for more pain than others. ♦️ Property in America, which bore the brunt of the fallout from the subprime-lending crisis, appears better insulated than many large economies
Replying to @TheEconomist
♦️ Housing markets in Britain and France could fare better in the short term but look exposed if rates rise further ♦️ Prices may be most sensitive to rate rises in Australia and New Zealand, Canada and the Nordics
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
♦️ The rising cost of money could make homeowners’ existing debt burdens difficult to manage by increasing their repayments, while putting off some prospective buyers. If that hit to demand is big enough, prices could start to fall
Replying to @TheEconomist
Some housing markets seem set for more pain than others. ♦️ Property in America, which bore the brunt of the fallout from the subprime-lending crisis, appears better insulated than many large economies
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
♦️ Changes are brewing, however. For more than a decade homeowners benefited from ultra-low interest rates. Now most central banks in the rich world have either started pressing the monetary brakes, or are preparing to do so
Replying to @TheEconomist
♦️ The rising cost of money could make homeowners’ existing debt burdens difficult to manage by increasing their repayments, while putting off some prospective buyers. If that hit to demand is big enough, prices could start to fall
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
The pandemic has also contributed to the housing glut. Since March 2020, American house prices have risen by 33% as a shift towards remote working and restrictions have changed where homebuyers want to live economist.com/interactive/gr…
Replying to @TheEconomist
♦️ Changes are brewing, however. For more than a decade homeowners benefited from ultra-low interest rates. Now most central banks in the rich world have either started pressing the monetary brakes, or are preparing to do so
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
Homes in America and Britain are selling faster than ever. House prices in Canada have soared by 26% since the start of the pandemic. The average property in New Zealand could set you back more than NZ$1m ($640,000), an increase of nearly 46% since 2019 econ.st/39oov7r pic.twitter.com/2mdBP5Ebzf
Replying to @TheEconomist
The pandemic has also contributed to the housing glut. Since March 2020, American house prices have risen by 33% as a shift towards remote working and restrictions have changed where homebuyers want to live economist.com/interactive/gr…
American homebuyers are flocking to warm suburbs
economist.com
 
In reply to @TheEconomist
You wouldn’t know a global recession looms when looking at the rich world’s housing markets, many of which continue to break records econ.st/39oov7r
Replying to @TheEconomist
Homes in America and Britain are selling faster than ever. House prices in Canada have soared by 26% since the start of the pandemic. The average property in New Zealand could set you back more than NZ$1m ($640,000), an increase of nearly 46% since 2019 econ.st/39oov7r
 
 
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