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Analysed 4,908 tweets, tweets from the last 456 weeks.
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Last 50 tweets from @sarahzhang
I was not expecting this conversation between @yayitsrob and @LumberTrading about lumber prices to connect beetles to floor design trends

theatlantic.com/science/archiv… pic.twitter.com/ReCQHO4chU
Replying to @sarahzhang
And building codes! Always building codes
 
I was not expecting this conversation between @yayitsrob and @LumberTrading about lumber prices to connect beetles to floor design trends

theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
 
What worse divine punishment than making a big pot of your favorite food, eating one serving, feeling sick, and now feeling disgusted by all the leftovers you were once looking forward to
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
My new book—AN IMMENSE WORLD—comes out this summer. It’s about how other animals sense the world, and the very different version of reality that they perceive.

Here’s a thread about the book, why I wrote it, and why I hope you'll enjoy it. 1/

bookshop.org/books/an-immen…
 
“bonbon naturelle”
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
also, i am going to make these brownies tonight
Replying to @sarahzhang
update: the brownie + pb parts are good but the frosting is way too sweet. halve or replace with dark chocolate ganache?
 
Cases are peaking in states hit first by Omicron— whew! glad the peak isn't higher—but as @KatherineJWu explains, lots of reasons to think this Omicron wave gets worse before it gets better for the US theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
 
The joy of wordle imho is charting a new path everyday, not finding the most optimal one, which is why I will not be posting my scores thank you goodbye
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
It's really maddening to hear that people should isolate for 10 days or 14 days or 5 days if they get paid leave to isolate for 0 days theatlantic.com/politics/archi…
 
File under: the longterm effects of other common viruses are poorly understood too
In a new study, researchers report the most compelling evidence yet of a strong link between Epstein-Barr virus and multiple sclerosis—the most common disabling neurologic disease among young people.

statnews.com/2022/01/13/str…
 
very much appreciated this slightly demented quest to find the origin of Joanna Gaines's brownie recipe eater.com/pop-culture/22…
Replying to @sarahzhang
also, i am going to make these brownies tonight
 
very much appreciated this slightly demented quest to find the origin of Joanna Gaines's brownie recipe eater.com/pop-culture/22…
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
This is one of the most important articles I'll write all year—and the most complete framework for how I'm thinking about progress, public policy, and a better future for all Americans:

America needs an "abundance agenda"

theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
 
A very sick man tells his son from the hospital that he is getting a pig heart. Son think his father has become delirious.

But then: "I realized, 'Man, he is telling the truth and not going crazy. And he could be the first ever.'"

nytimes.com/2022/01/10/hea…
 
Omicron is forcing us to recognize that even vaccinated people can't avoid COVID.

So now we have to figure out: What do we do about all these mild breakthrough infections?

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Replying to @sarahzhang
On one hand, this is a good question to ask because we will probably be getting mild breakthroughs forever—even when COVID is endemic. Unfortunately, we are scrambling to answer it in the middle of an emergency. theatlantic.com/health/archive…
 
Omicron is forcing us to recognize that even vaccinated people can't avoid COVID.

So now we have to figure out: What do we do about all these mild breakthrough infections?

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
 
 
- got Colbert to photoshop a hamster with a bottle of Everclear ✅
 
Back in March 2020, I wrote about the consequences of cancelling "elective" surgeries, which are not optional surgeries but just anything short of a dire emergency. Can't believe we're here again.

theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
What It Really Means to Cancel Elective Surgeries
theatlantic.com
 
This is what the slow-motion collapse of our hospitals looks like in the pandemic. It happens slowly and invisibly—then one day you have a medical emergency and you have to wait and wait and wait

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
 
In reply to @rkhamsi
Truthfully, one reason I rewatched the film is I’ve been thinking a lot about the case fatality rate (ratio?) scenarios. The chimeric virus in the film has one around 25%. Given our health systems difficulties currently I wonder how we would handle something with a higher CFR.
Replying to @rkhamsi
Pandemic movies did not prepare me for a virus with CFR of 1.5% which is in some ways more pernicious—seems mild enough people are more tempted to roll the dice!
 
Just as we're getting a huge spike in Omicron cases, as @COVID19Tracking's @kissane explains, our methods of counting cases are getting all screwed up.

It will be hard to know the real COVID situation over the next couple of weeks.

theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/…
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
Omicron is replaying our past pandemic mistakes on fast-forward.

Here's a piece about 6 errors that we keep repeating, jointly written by your very tired pandemic reporters--@KatherineJWu, @sarahzhang, and me.

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Omicron Is Our Past Pandemic Mistakes on Fast-Forward
theatlantic.com
 
In reply to @zoonotic1
It has this gut punch of sentence at the end. God I miss May of 2020! “ “It may be five years down the road, and COVID is a distant memory, and then it is used for FIP,” Weigner says. ”
Replying to @zoonotic1 @ENirenberg and 1 otherfalse
hey we still have three years to turn this around
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
Our picture of Omicron is always going to be several days behind because of lags in sequencing/testing. The CDC's 3% number for the U.S. is almost certainly too, too low given how fast it's spreading theatlantic.com/science/archiv… 3/x
Replying to @sarahzhang
The point is: We know enough. We're going to have a huge number of Omicron cases, and it doesn't so far seem dramatically mild enough that we can dismiss a huge wave. By the time we know for sure about severity, it might be too late for our hospitals theatlantic.com/science/archiv… 4/4
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
Btw, I had to rewrite the lede twice because London Omicron cases went from over 50 to 60 to 72% in the course of writing the story. And actually, *just* realized even 72% is outdated. Now at 80% from specimens 3 days ago... 2/x
Replying to @sarahzhang
Our picture of Omicron is always going to be several days behind because of lags in sequencing/testing. The CDC's 3% number for the U.S. is almost certainly too, too low given how fast it's spreading theatlantic.com/science/archiv… 3/x
 
Just two weeks ago, Omicron was at 1 or 2% in Europe. Now, it's 72% of new cases in London.

This is going to be our reality soon. The Omicron wave is coming upon us very, very fast. 1/x

theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
Replying to @sarahzhang
Btw, I had to rewrite the lede twice because London Omicron cases went from over 50 to 60 to 72% in the course of writing the story. And actually, *just* realized even 72% is outdated. Now at 80% from specimens 3 days ago... 2/x
80% of cases in London with specimens from 14 December were Omicron.

(On 1 December these made up only 2% of cases) pic.twitter.com/jNv2kjaYBY
 
Just two weeks ago, Omicron was at 1 or 2% in Europe. Now, it's 72% of new cases in London.

This is going to be our reality soon. The Omicron wave is coming upon us very, very fast. 1/x

theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
🚨Well, I wrote about Omicron--what we know & what it means.

I feel the core problem is unchanged: The variant poses a much greater threat at the societal level than the individual one, making it the kind of problem the US has consistently flubbed. 1/
theatlantic.com/health/archive…
America Is Not Ready for Omicron
theatlantic.com
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
I need a proper timeline/explainer at this point.
Replying to @debivort
i would listen to an hourlong podcast that attempts to piece together a proper timeline
 
the most incredible update: Jean and Jorts managed to convince THREE people to get vaccinated which is three more than all of twitter
twitter.com/Rainbowmazin/s…
Replying to @sarahzhang
hang on, i misread, FOUR people
 
the most incredible update: Jean and Jorts managed to convince THREE people to get vaccinated which is three more than all of twitter
twitter.com/Rainbowmazin/s…
AITA for “perpetuating ethnic stereotypes” about Jorts? bit.ly/3ytjsLC pic.twitter.com/pHFeuxhoqH
 
"Botox injections, face lifts and other cosmetic alterations to make the camels more attractive are strictly prohibited"

nbcnews.com/news/world/doz…
 
Have you ever read a lede and thought, damn, this is what Rutger Hauer would say to Harrison Ford before dying in the rain theatlantic.com/science/archiv…
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
A sketch to explain how a new variant may appear milder even with no change in underlying virulence. This can occur because, when calculating the fraction of cases that are severe, the denominator now includes many re-infections that had previously been averted. A thread. 1/8
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
And a lot more details on neutralizing antibody data and boosters for Omicron, from @KatherineJWu who is writing at superhuman speed theatlantic.com/science/archiv… theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Replying to @sarahzhang
And @rachgutman on what Omicron means for the vaccinated. Sorry but this variant is *everybody's* problem now theatlantic.com/health/archive…
 
Sarah Zhang Retweeted ·  
I'm sorry to say I'm worried about Omicron.

A lot we still don't know, but this much is becoming clear: Cases are rising very, very fast in places with high immunity to COVID

1/

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Omicrons Explosive Growth Is a Warning Sign
theatlantic.com
 
Right now, Omicron is spreading as fast in places with *high immunity* as the original virus did in places with *no immunity* in early 2020.

This is bad news, even if most cases are mild. I wrote about why here:

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Omicrons Explosive Growth Is a Warning Sign
theatlantic.com
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
Full story. As I said, plenty of uncertainty still, but we've seen enough to take Omicron seriously theatlantic.com/health/archive… 5/5
Replying to @sarahzhang
And a lot more details on neutralizing antibody data and boosters for Omicron, from @KatherineJWu who is writing at superhuman speed theatlantic.com/science/archiv… theatlantic.com/health/archive…
 
Two pieces that pair well together. Omicron is showing signs that it *could* be bad from a big picture perspective: theatlantic.com/health/archive…
On a personal level, there's nothing really new to do (get boosted), except remember that yeah, things are uncertain emilyoster.substack.com/p/is-it-always…
Replying to @shanpalus
yes! that's exactly the problem. the shift in anyone's individual risk is fairly small but when you multiply that by the whole population, you still get a lot more bad outcomes. it's a societal risk and we (me included) have a hard time grokking that
 
1/x This is the best, most comprehensive take I’ve seen on the idea of “endemicity” re: #SARSCoV2/#COVID19

Also, @sarahzhang … wow. She is pumping out highly informative #COVID19 articles on a daily basis. Makes me tired just thinking about how hard she’s working!
Replying to @WhitneyEpi
thank you, whitney! i am tired too...but also feel like everyone else is working harder than me
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
I'm not personally worried about getting very sick with COVID—or that any vaccinated loved ones would. These are pretty rare events. But rare events across many, many cases can still add up to a lot hospitalizations and deaths, and we don't want hospitals overwhelmed again 4/
Replying to @sarahzhang
Full story. As I said, plenty of uncertainty still, but we've seen enough to take Omicron seriously theatlantic.com/health/archive… 5/5
Omicrons Explosive Growth Is a Warning Sign
theatlantic.com
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
For context, I've been living a pretty normal life these last few months. I go to movies. I eat inside restaurants. I've hopped on a bunch of planes and traveled internationally. But I do think Omicron should prompt us to rethink that might be necessary soon. 3/
Replying to @sarahzhang
I'm not personally worried about getting very sick with COVID—or that any vaccinated loved ones would. These are pretty rare events. But rare events across many, many cases can still add up to a lot hospitalizations and deaths, and we don't want hospitals overwhelmed again 4/
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
Even if most cases are mild—though, as I explain in the piece, Omicron may not end up as mild as it currently looks—we have a simple math problem on our hands. A tiny % of a huge # is still a big #. With Omicron, we really could get to a huge # of cases. More than Delta 2/
Replying to @sarahzhang
For context, I've been living a pretty normal life these last few months. I go to movies. I eat inside restaurants. I've hopped on a bunch of planes and traveled internationally. But I do think Omicron should prompt us to rethink that might be necessary soon. 3/
 
I'm sorry to say I'm worried about Omicron.

A lot we still don't know, but this much is becoming clear: Cases are rising very, very fast in places with high immunity to COVID

1/

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Replying to @sarahzhang
Even if most cases are mild—though, as I explain in the piece, Omicron may not end up as mild as it currently looks—we have a simple math problem on our hands. A tiny % of a huge # is still a big #. With Omicron, we really could get to a huge # of cases. More than Delta 2/
 
I'm sorry to say I'm worried about Omicron.

A lot we still don't know, but this much is becoming clear: Cases are rising very, very fast in places with high immunity to COVID

1/

theatlantic.com/health/archive…
Omicrons Explosive Growth Is a Warning Sign
theatlantic.com
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
This is a very unfortunate symptom but sets up an interesting question of what is causing post-cold teeth hurting?
Replying to @ordovas_phd
I thought it was just because the nerves of your upper molars are pretty close to your sinuses and everything gets squished together when your sinuses are inflamed (very technical explanation)
 
In reply to @sarahzhang
Hope you get well soon!
Replying to @MCSlab_uiuc
thanks! i mostly feel fine except for this weird tooth thing
 
In reply to @RogersWork
but ass colds are also bad!
 
I caught a normal cold more than two weeks ago and my teeth still hurt every time I shake my head because of lingering sinusitis
Replying to @sarahzhang
regular ass colds, still bad, man
 
 
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